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in u.s. history. sandy could cause more wind and flood damage than hurricane irene did last year. new york city and especially lower manhattan saw its shares of flooding monday with water reaching record levels in some areas. and speaking of which, cnbc's bertha coombs is live for us outside the new york stock exchange this morning. thank you so much for joining us. can you tell us what conditions are like where you are and what dnlg you' damage you're seeing? >> reporter: it's actually fairly dry. last night in fact the new york stock exchange take to go twitter to dispel rumors that the trading floor was under three feet of water. if you can take a look behind me, the new york stock exchange floor is actually half a floor from the street level where those first balconies are. so for to be under water would be tremendous. we didn't have water in this part of lower manhattan despite that record surge. it was mostly over in the battery. will is significant flooding in several low lying areas especially near rivers. that's on the lower east side. we actually saw a transformer there blow
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
the candidates are neck-and-neck. >> hold on tight. irene takes me on a fast pace tour of the retirement community in her golf cart. florida is home to many retirees, and a high proportion of them vote. i asked her if they are aware of their influence. >> well, you know, we have people in here 94, 93, 99. some of them are still pretty sharp, and then you have others who are not near that age that do not know what day of the week it is. >> most residents in the community have healthy finances and can afford to pay their rent and purchase a home here. that makes them more likely to lean republican. that is the case with irene, who has supported the republicans for over 60 years. but now, she fears that mitt romney may cut her social security and medicare benefits or privatize them. >> i have never been torn like this in any election, and that's the god's truth. i could have lied to you and said i will vote for romney, but i do not know if i am, and i am a republican. >> state pensions and health care are among the biggest contributors to u.s. deficits. americans agree that government spend
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
: last year's hurricane irene was the most recent storm to pummel the northeast. it cost the industry roughly $4.3 billion in insured losses. analysts can't yet predict how steep losses from sandy will be, but they say the companies with the most exposure include: liberty mutual, travelers, allstate, and chubb. auden thinks those firms will be able to shoulder a financial hit if the storm's damage mirrors that of irene. >> with every event companies gather more information on potential losses, so catastrophe losses become much more sophisticated. companies use those to measure aggregation of losses and potential losses from a given event. >> reporter: damage from wind, falling trees, and rain coming through roofs is covered by standard insurance policies. but analysts fear much of the damage from sandy to homes and businesses is likely to come from storm surge flooding which isn't. the insurance information institute estimates roughly 300,000 homes in the northeast could be vulnerable to this type of event. but the institute is optimistic many homeowners have flood insurance. >> nothi
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
, than last year's hurricane irene. with winds near 80 miles an hour, right now hurricane sandy is moving north along the eastern seaboard, already impacting portions of florida and georgia. mary thompson is tracking preparations ahead of the big storm. >> it's already been dubbed frankenstorm over the halloween horror story at lowe's. the east coast of course bracing for a storm with potential to do billions in damage. the latest update from noaa says heavy rains and flooding is forecast in the mid-atlantic states but high winds could be felt from the carolinas all the way up through new england. corporate america's prepping to serve both customers and protect its employees in light of this storm. at lowe's, a 24-hour command center tracks the storm while it shipped generators, batteries, chainsaws and other items in high demand after the storm to northeast markets expected to be impacted by sandy. as for the power provider, citi noting four with big exposure to the mid-atlantic and pennsylvania areas where the heaviest rains and flooding are forecast. banks saying any earnings risks for
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
. >> larry, people are comparing this storm to last year's hurricane irene the tenth costliest in history. now from its command center today, home depot sending sump pumps, shop vacs anticipating lining irene a lot of coastal and inland flooding. for home depot that means demand for carpeting picks up after the storm. if there's any extra profit for the retail that comes out of this storm it comes from demand not pricing. home depot locked in prices this morning just to make sure that consumers will not get gouged. as for paying for the property, property and casualty insurers in good shape thanks to higher premiums and a lack of major events. a major storm may allow some of them to pass on higher prices to their clients. restaurants will see business decline. restaurants like this group you see here can take solace from the fact the storm is hitting did your the slow part of their week. as for the power provider the big exposure these four have in the mid-atlantic region where the heaviest rains and flooded is forecast. any earnings risk lies in prolonged outages in those areas. farther
than irene's 15.8 billion, last year. but far below katrina's 108-billion dollars and 18-hundred deaths and missing in 2005. unless there is damage to infrastructure, economists say ports and rail yards will make up for lost business quickly. some stock trades, perhaps not--because a light week was expected pending the outcome of the presidential race, a week from now. among insurers, allstate, travelers and chubb corp have the largest market share in sandy's path. corelogic, estimates it includes 284,000 homes worth $88-billion dollars. economists are mixed on whether the storm's impact will affect fourth- quarter g-d-p. mark vitner, senior economist with wells fargo securities says it depends how much is shut down and for how long. mark zandi at moody's analytics says the storm may cause spikes in economic activity--repairing and rebuilding. depsite the storm-- the government is expected to report unemployment numbers for october this friday. phone companies along the east coast are preparing for the likelihood of overtaxed communication infrastructure during hurricane sandy. at&t is
. >> damages are likely to surpass those of last year's hurricane irene. sandy has move left much flooding in its wake, paralyzing new york's mass transit system and leaving millions in the dark -- sandy has left much flooding in its wake. >> here is more from america's most populous city. >> the storm has moved on, but the water remains. many of the city's road and subway tunnels are still flooded. public transport will be out of action for days to come. the effects of sandy can be seen on the streets -- residents are relieved that the worst is now behind them. >> well, last night, we could look down this street here, and we saw the river coming toward us. it actually look like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> near central park, a crane dangles from a construction site over the street below. the storm caused it to partially collapsed. there are still strong winds, but nothing like those of monday night, which saw gusts of up to 130 kilometers per hour. there were record levels of flood water. emergency services are working around the clock. firefighters were called to a l
, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-lateshutdown since 1888. but the major exchanges are expected to reopen tomorrow. all systems are a go. the new york stock exchange said the opening bell will ring as usual at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. the nasdaq will also open for normal operations on wednesday. that's just what investors wanted to hear. both exchanges have been running tests today to make sure all systems were running smoothly. >> susie: the nyse's building is located on wall street, just blocks away from the section of lower manhattan that was deluged by hurricane sandy. but there was no flooding at the big board, and no other damage to the building, trading floor and trading systems. but while the nyse and nasdaq expect tomorrow to be business as usual, it won't be a typical day for people trying to get to work. many of new york's bridges and tunnels are stil closed nd
of gasoline as opposed to the producer, and some other hurricanes like katrina and irene before, they've hit an area that has been a big producer of oil, whereas really, in the northeast, they are the consumers of all of that gasoline, and so demand has dropped, but the supply hasn't really dropped as much. > > so the demand is dropping, especially as people are stuck home and not going to offices for instance. > > right. flights are canceled, and people are not driving around as you said, so the demand there has dropped, and that, interestingly enough, has pushed some prices in the southeast region down even further because that oil that usually would have gone to the northeast has dropped off a little bit. > > so much of this boils down to what's going on with the refineries. so what do you anticipate there? you know, we think that this is going to be just a temporary shutdown in the northeast region, and that, as i said earlier, we are going to continue to see prices continue to drop, and demand will come back up after the hurricane is through. > > quick predictions now: where do you see
on the boardwalk. many people have heeded the warnings. they are remembering what happened with irene last year. other people are saying, you know, we have been through the storms before. we are hunkering down and we are not leaking. of course, our fingers are crossed for them. connell: along the shoreline, for better or worse with a large group of people. dagen: breaking news on the water moving into new york city and manhattan our sister station is reporting that parts of fdr drive, this is one of the two main arteries in and out of new york city that runs along the edge of manhattan. on the east side of manhattan is fdr drive, that is now underwater according to fox five. fdr drive is on the east side of manhattan. this is a critical artery of moving traffic in and out of new york city. at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, both the holland and brooklyn battery tunnel will be closing. if people are not in the city or out of the city in a matter of hours, you will not have a choice. you will have to stay right where you are. dagen: if you went up the right side of the horseshoe there, the east river is
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
. the estimates begin at a billion dollars and head north from there. based on the cost of irene at the same time last year when power was out in new england. we get the latest on the storm now from bryan norcross at the weather channel. what's the latest? >> this hurricane is in the bahamas now. and it is heading north. and the big concern, i think it's going to dominate your lives starting this weekend there in the new york city area and all of the northeast. let's take a look at this graphic here. there's the hurricane moving north through the bahamas. it bends offshore but over the weekend, it's affecting the carolinas with pretty good winds right along the coast. and then early next week, it bends in to the northeast. we have never had a storm come out of the topics and bend in like that. so the thinking is that somewhere from props the delaware bay area, south jersey area north, this is going to drive water all along the beaches. and this has the potential to cause tremendous damage along the coastline and the whole scenario we had with irene in new york city and the transportation problems
they will be able to recoup it. we have seen it happen after the hurricane irene. the question is what kind of a backlash utilities will face to their storm restoration efforts. they're trying their best but it will take many days before the power service is restored. and that usually triggers a lot of regulatory scrutiny and that is not good news for utilities. >> as you look at the president's helicopter fleet there touring atlantic city, are any single companies of those you follow here more at risk to really devastating hits on their balance sheets or not? can you handicap it in any way for us? >> well, ouriously obviously ns the hardest hit area. 50% of households currently in new jersey are without power. coastal communities in new jersey and on long island should have the highest impact. so percentage, jcp and l, lipa on long island will have the highest impacts. we will be following especially jcp&l and the connecticut utility given the fact that their storm response after hurricane irene was the really harshly criticized by regulators and they really cannot afford to do it again.
. that is a worrying sign for jetblue. hurricane irene affected them. florida was one of their main ports and they got affected by hurricane irene. that will bring down their of the pros. just a year ago there was lockout and they didn't pass the faa taxes for the airlines. airlines pocketed that. this year the tax is in place. airlines aren't going to see that. david: okay. >> so we'll see jetblue miss. we have two bold estimates on the negative side. these are the best rated analysts that are below the estimate. david: we have to do this quickly because we're running out of time. final loser, the final one that will disappoint on expectations natural resources company called cliffs. they actually had a 6% bump their stock, so you're going against the trend? >> we are. in fact they also have analysts that are far below the consensus. the smart estimate is 10 cents below the consensus estimate. that says the best analysts and latest --. david: so people aren't confused out there. you see green arrows and plus signs. sri is saying no, this will disappoint. even though up today a big disappointment in e
after irene, sandy is making me go back to that one. it is a high quality luxury home furniture ipo that is growing like a weed. that is why i want you to get a piece of it. back in 2008, the combination of the recession wreaked havoc on it and the company has taken a hit. once it was private the new owners did something they never could have gotten away with. they doubled down with big ticket furniture. ritzy chandeliers and closing many of it's old stores and replacing them with free standing galleries. they are putting up pretty good numbers. the company is taking shares with the home furnishing markets. it is a smaller store base than william senoma. so the company has a lot of room to expand. restoration posted a 27.8% increase in same store sales and for the last 12 months in july they had a 29% increase. people these are bullish numbers. william senoma, these other guys aren't close to their growth rate. that is more expensive than william see gnosenoma. but i think they deserve the rate. it has the highest growth in the group. we need a new housing related stock and we are i
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
damage has been minimal compared to what we went through last year when hurricane irene and tropical storm lee came through in the billions. we have to get an assessment. we're getting out of the roadways now. the eastern part of the state. we don't have any aircraft up at this point. we will do that tomorrow. major roads seem to be fine, even secondary roads seem to be fine. the assessment to the end of the week. melissa: how financially prepared are you to make those repairs? will you call for federal aid? >> we receive federal aid in the preplanning process and we hope we are not going to be anywhere near the problems new jersey faced watching the television. preplanning with the money use, we will reimburse for that. ashley: for those people affected by this storm or in the wake of that what advice are you giving them? >> for those in central pennsylvania, the same advice, be careful going outside, stay off the roads, remind them to watch the creeks in low-lying areas because creeks come up quickly, and flooding affects them briefly. melissa: thank you for joining us. the new yor
johnson has more. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the literature. >> the grants help fund internships including at ucsf, children's berkeley. >> i
. >> when irene medina returned to high school this fall she had plenty of stories to tell about her summer job. >> i did my first surgery in iraq. it was interesting and exciting for me. >> instead of flipping burgers , she was helping researchers at ucsf understand brain function. it is helping newborn infants survive brain traumas and other injuries. >> i started thinking, what they are doing is something great. >> across the bay at the university of california, they were doing great science too working on a study that could some day help human muscles regenerate. >> we saw improved muscle regeneration, actually. it was interesting. >> the path into these high end labs began with internship programs from the california institute of regenerative medicine. once in the program they are assigned mentors to gather them in real life lab assignments. >> they get down to the genetic level and cellular level, and they really understand that their specific part of the project including the literature. >> the grants help fund internships including at ucsf, children's berkeley. >> i think it is an e
, and irene, lost their home so they came over and they stayed with sheridan and his brother at their home, which was not damaged by the fire. so they were married, and he ended up having three daughters and a son. and she was, i think in her early 20s when they married in 1875, and he was 42 or something like that. very happy marriage, and then they all moved to washington when he became general in chief. but he did not have a home life. his life was the army. >> he was there because of the expansion of the north. was it just northerners or was it southerners in the manifest destiny, too? >> they were into it, too. definitely. >> what happened with regard to -- if the south had won. >> i think so. they were into it because the -- before the war because they hoped to get more slave states and keep the balance in congress and everything. but, yeah, there were southerners -- but the great majority, i would say, just because of the way the population was, and the immigrants all came into the northeast. they kind of flowed from the northeast, through the midwest, and on out. but there were som
the great chicago fire. she was just a teenager, and rucker and his wife and irene lost their home. so they came over, and they stayed with sheridan and his brother at their home which was not damaged by the fire. so they were married, and he ended up having three daughters and a son, and she was, i think, in her early 20s when they married in 1875. and he was 42 or something like that. they had a very happy marriage. and then she -- they all moved to washington went he became general in chief. but before that he did not have a home life at all. i mean, his life was the army. yes. >> [inaudible] into the west, and he was out there because of the expansion. was it just northerners, or were the southerners into manifest destiny too? >> oh, they were into it too. yeah, definitely. >> so it would have happened regardless if the south had won? >> i think so. they were into it before the war because they hoped to get more slave statements out there, too, and -- states out there, too, and keep the balance in congress and everything. yeah, there were southerners. but the great majority, i woul
, then look what happens here, kind of just rotates and spins and that's the scary aspect. remember, irene in vermont all that flooding. sandy is rotating and spinning for 24 hours dumping an inch of rain an hour. so, this is the potential for devastating and deadly flooding. couple that with, of course, this wind field 70-mile-per-hour winds extending 450 miles out and the potent energy with this bringing snow potentially to the mountains on the western side of it. so, guys, this -- computer models have been for 25 years and they have never had to run this exact scenario. so, a lot of very intriguing, but scary things about it. >> alexandria, thanks. >>> a storm of this size can cause a nightmare, not just in terms of -- they are asking people to come in from out of state to help the power company. also opening a staging area at baltimore's airport to prepare for the storm's arrival. >>> 300 national guardsmen can be put on recovery. >>> the storm is already having an impact on the presidential campaigns, especially in some key swing states. both vice president biden and mitt romney cance
for hurricane irene, several billion related to that. does it m needle from a macro point of view? >> from the top level, not really so much. obviously the damage has to be paid for and obviously that might mean infrastructure spending. so you take away from with one hand, you gain with the other. obviously different sectors will have different takes and so on. i think the thing we're thinking about at the moment is that the u.s. economy together with the global economy is very fragile. we have low growth if not recession in europe and i think the financial markets are also very fragile, not justs because they're struggling to make gains where you have the tug of war between the core fundamentals versus the central bank liquidity, but volume has been so thin all year and then we have this event which could dry up the volume further. so things are flanragile. >> and low volume means liquid markets and could see dislocations? >> if we see for whatever reason some sort of selling coming into the market with low liquidity, you could see the market can down quite quickly. >> basically whenever
there i think contractors and i use it for my beach house redo after irene, sandy is making me go back to that one. the real story is that rest oration heart wear is growing like a weed. that's why i want to you get a piece of this ipo. back in 2008, the combination of the recession wreaked havoc on it and the company has taken a hit. once it was private the new owners did something they never could have gotten away with. they had restoration doubled down on being an upscale down with big ticket furniture. you need a big house for this. ritzy chandeliers and closing many of it's old stores and replacing them with free standing galleries. fast forward to today. they are putting up pretty good numbers. the company is taking shares with the home furnishing markets. by targeting high income consumers. it is a smaller store base than williamson opena. so the company has a lot of room to expand. in the most recent nine-week period, restoration posted a 27.8% increase in same store sales. for the last 12 months in july they had a 29% increase. people these are bullish numbers. william sonoma,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)